Aimee J.

Ask me anythingNext pageArchive

"

I’ve never been female. But I have been black my whole life. I can perhaps offer some insight from that perspective. There are many similar social issues related to access to equal opportunity that we find in the black community, as well as the community of women in a white male dominate society…

When I look at — throughout my life — I’ve known that I wanted to do astrophysics since I was 9 years old…I got to see how the world around me reacted to my expressions of these ambitions. All I can say is, the fact that I wanted to be a scientist, an astrophysicist was hands down the path of most resistance through the forces of society.

Anytime I expressed this interest, teachers would say, ‘Oh, don’t you wanna be an athlete?’ I want to become someone that was outside of the paradigm of expectations of the people in power. Fortunately, my depth of interest of the universe was so deep and so fuel enriched that everyone of these curve balls that I was thrown, and fences built in front of me, and hills that I had to climb, I just reach for more fuel, and I just kept going.

Now, here I am, one of the most visible scientists in the land, and I wanna look behind me and say, ‘Where are the others who might have been this,’ and they’re not there! …I happened to survive and others did not simply because of forces of society that prevented it at every turn. At every turn.

…My life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks, when you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today.

So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity, then we can have that conversation.

"

-

Neil DeGrasse Tyson in response to a question posed by Lawrence Summers, former Treasury Security and Harvard University President

"What’s up with chicks and science?"

Are there genetic differences between men and women, explain why more men are in science.

(via magnius159)

(via fuckyeahethnicwomen)

digitaldesperados:

These photos are from the archives of the Indian Express 2013 and capture moments from when women who are widows were allowed to join the Holi celebrations. 

They say “ Breaking the shackles of tradition, around 800 widows played Holi with gulal and flowers in the land of Lord Krishna, Vrindavan in four-day Holi celebrations that began on March 24. 

Vrindavan Holi is an effort to free widows from the shackles of age-old tradition. Not only will the widows play Holi, they will also participate in cultural programmes.

The widows feel such celebrations would prove to be an unprecedented step towards ending social prejudice against them. The event this year may need some amount of change in the mindset of the society.

However, the ‘breaking’ of traditions by widows in Vrindavan has drawn criticism from a section of religious leaders who believe that it is an ‘infringement of our ancient culture’.

In the past, widows living in the ashrams could have played Holi only with Thakurji (Lord Krishna).

A veteran in the popular Ram Lila act, Shankar Lal Chaturvedi criticised the event, saying, ‘The manner in which they smeared face of each other with gulal is not good.’ ”

The photos show the women (who are widows) praying, tossing flowers and generally celebrating Holi at at the Meera Sahavagini ashram in Vrindavan.



(via fuckyeahethnicwomen)

dc-via-chicago:

soafrolicious:

fuckyeahfeminists:

love the diversity in hair styles and textures here.

Who is the artist???

Tim Okamura.

(Source: lostinurbanism, via fuckyeahethnicwomen)

coolboyclub:

*applies for job*
*scratches out Black and writes New Black*
*gets job instantly*

(via kawaiiflowerchild)

adambloghart:

uscongress:

im about to get so tan you guys 

- Icarus’s last words 

(via do-black-people-do-stuff)

Anonymous asked: You wake up next to a dude can't remember but he's hot af

scodaillest:

taint3ed:

euro-trotter:

brownglucose:

taint3ed:

LMAO

BITCH ME TOO, THE FUCK.

Ahhh stoooppppppp reblogging this

Lmao

dynamicafrica:

"The Untold Renaissance": Ikire Jones Spring/Summer 2014 Lookbook.

It’s all dapper hommes, suave strides and bold prints and patterns in Nigerian designer Wale Oyejide’s Spring/Summer 2014 lookbook for his brand Ikire Jones.

“This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered.”

(via tamarindballz)

allbeautifulblackgirls:

afrocentricmisfit:

she is a magic woman.
brown skin.

More Black beauties here

(via black-culture)

County attorney says he will prosecute Shanesha Taylor for felonies

soulrevision:

[For more on social justice, follow me on Instagram: soulrevision]

Despite public outcry, Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery said Wednesday he will move forward with the felony child abuse prosecution of Shanesha Taylor, the jobless mom whose Scottsdale arrest has drawn national attention and prompted calls for Taylor to receive assistance rather than punishment. 

Attorney Bill Montgomery’s office received a petition on Tuesday with 12,000 signatures asking for Shanesha’s charges to be dropped. "First, they weren’t signatures; they were just a list of names," Montgomery said, referring to a printout from the website. "So I don’t know whether any of the individuals in their pajamas who logged on to the site and put their name on there really had a clue of all the circumstances involved in this particular case.

Apparently signatures aren’t good enough, let’s call County Attorney Bill Montgomery’s office & tell him to drop the charges against Shanesha Taylor —-> (602) 506-3411

(via black-culture)

wocinsolidarity:

sister is a verb

(Source: fuckyeahdragrace.com, via black-culture)

jahanzebjz:

Racism is not ended by being nice. Nice is an attitude. You could be nice to your slave. Racism is not an attitude; racism is about power. 

(via misterdelfuego)

ohsnapthatskilla:

Why SZA’s Huge Natural Hair is Our New Obsession
by Chioma Nnadi

After the ethereal sound of her voice, the single most mesmerizing thing about singer SZA is her hair. Her super voluminous curls fill the frame of music videos and lend a spellbinding halo effect to performances center stage. “I’m a late bloomer and a total tomboy,” says the New Jersey native. “My hair is definitely my saving grace where femininity is concerned.” As the only girl on a record label roster that includes West Coast hip-hop prodigy Kendrick Lamar, the talented 24-year-old certainly holds her own, and releases her first solo album, Z, on TDE next month. Her vibrant tresses have a triumphant story of their very own: After falling ill as a teenager, she lost all of her hair from medication-related side effects, and her wild natural curls have been a badge of honor ever since. We sat down with SZA to talk about her childhood influences, Lauryn Hill’s dreads, the joys of co-washing, and why every girl needs a pot of coconut oil in her life.

When did you start wearing your hair so big?
Well I guess I’ve been looking this way since middle school, before big natural hair was even popular. My mom was adamant about not doing anything to my hair. I grew up Muslim, and wore the hijab through middle school. The only girl that I could look to for natural hair inspiration growing up was Lauryn Hill. I wanted dreads but my mom wanted me to wait until I was sixteen, by which time I didn’t want them anymore.

How did you look after your hair growing up?
I broke so many combs and brushes growing up that eventually my mom decided that we should perm it. I was in eighth grade. So all my curls were stretched out and I had these superlong pigtails that fell down my back—but chemical straighteners break your hair, and I ended up going through so many hair transformations from there on. I remember bleaching part of my hair platinum blonde, Cruella De Vil-style, the day before an important meeting with Howard University when I was in eleventh grade. My mom was furious. I also got really ill in high school and my hair fell out because of the medication I was taking.

How did losing your hair affect you?
It’s such a big part of my personality so it was really tough. I hid behind my hair before, but I had nothing to hide behind in that moment. I think the very idea of femininity fell apart for me, but in a good way, because after that, the superficial things didn’t matter so much. None of it mattered. I don’t even shave my legs. Today is the most made-up I’ve ever been in my life. My mom on the other hand, is the classiest woman I know. She has elegant hands, and always gets her nails done. I wonder if I’ll ever grow out of my jerseys and into a lady.

What do you do to look after your hair now?
I like to co-wash, which means washing without a shampoo. I just use a conditioner and coconut oil, and then I rinse my hair with lukewarm water instead of hot water which strips hair of all the moisture. I make my own deep conditioner from coconut oil, avocado, a drop of Pantene’s conditioner for women of color, cinnamon, and tea tree oil. Then I sit and catch up on TiVo’d episodes of Chopped and Iron Chef. If I have time I’ll twist it, but my hair takes days to dry so I usually blow-dry it out with a diffuser instead. I’ll lean over the blow-dryer and divide my hair into four sections, but I never comb it through because it breaks up the curls. I use a silicone-based heat protector to keep it from getting super frizzy, and coconut oil, and that melts in your hand and won’t weigh your hair down either. I haven’t had a chemical relaxer for at least six or seven years.

(via blackfoxx)

dynastylnoire:

blueklectic:

Dude in the purple…

yes lord

(Source: highkeygay, via blackfoxx)

"I don’t consider myself a feminist, I prefer to call myself a humanist or an egalitarian."

- Pseudo-intellectual white dude who prefers to imagine that he’s more enlightened than feminists and also is uncomfortable with the thought that he’s part of the problem and also has a incorrect conception of feminism. (via femmeanddangerous)

(Source: auto-rambler, via do-black-people-do-stuff)